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LPV Announces New Program Name

Leadership Pioneer Valley Announces New Program Name: LEAP

SPRINGFIELD, MA-Leadership Pioneer Valley (LPV) announced it’s new name and logo for their signature nine-month leadership development program: LEAP. Although LEAP is not an acronym, it is designed to have members interpret it in their own way. The first LEAP class is challenged to leap to places they have never been before and test their limits. T

“Leaping is different than running, it is leaving the ground with both feet which is risky, and so is leadership,” remarked Lora Wondolowski, Executive Director of Leadership Pioneer Valley.

Each year Leadership Pioneer Valley welcomes new participants who are taking a leap of faith into the program. Nearly 250 other leapers have completed the program landing in amazing new places since graduation and the Class of 2019 will do the same. They are the first LEAP class, but not the first class to leap to higher skills.

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“Ramps of Inclusion”

Our board has just finished the process of creating a vision statement for Leadership Pioneer Valley. I am proud of the inclusive and deliberative process that we undertook. At the end of the process, a board member commented that they couldn’t think of a single word that they would change. Our new vision is for a “vibrant Pioneer Valley with accessible, inclusive networks of inspired individuals who are leading and connecting the communities in which they live and work.” As we developed the statement we had a discussion about some of the key words and their meanings. Many of the small groups spent time on the words “accessible” and “inclusive.” There were some very powerful discussions on the differences between these two words. For some, it was not immediately apparent that they are different. As the daughter of a parent in a wheelchair, accessibility was always on our minds. Much of the world in the 1970’s and 1980’s was not accessible. There were places and activities that were simply not available to my dad. In some instances we were able access places if we were willing to carry my dad up a flight of stairs and endure the humiliation of the spectacle. In other instances, we would reserve a handicapped room and discover upon arrival that although we were able to enter the motel, the bathroom wasn’t accessible. I learned that there are degrees of accessibility. As the American’s with Disabilities Act came into effect, my dad began to have access to more establishments. But access did not equal inclusion. Many handicapped sections were in the back of the room or in the aisle. The majority of store clerks and wait staffs that we encountered did not include my father. They chose to speak to other members of the family instead of him. As a woman, I have also seen this first hand. There are several “men’s” leadership groups in the area that meet regularly–I and other women will never have access. Additionally, there is another group that is open to women but has never accepted one in its ranks. One board member remarked that there are opportunities she didn’t even know that exist. I know many other groups have similar experiences. The conversations of our board members as they navigated the importance of both accessibility and then inclusion underscored the responsibility of inclusion. Black history month reminds us that this country has made great strides towards accessibility. We have struck down laws that divide us and added others to increase accessibility for all. Yet inclusion is much harder to tackle. Women and folks of color are increasingly able to be at the table, yet are not always made to feel welcome. We may have built the handicapped ramps but still put the seats in the back of the room. I look forward to listening more for the voices of those that still don’t feel included and find ways to make our board rooms, offices, and communities more inclusive for those that we have invited to participate (that’s assuming that we are accessible). This is how we will make our vision a reality for the Valley.

Written by: Lora Wondolowski

Link to Article Online

Leadership Pioneer Valley Announces Addition of Rosemary Manu as Program Coordinator

Springfield, MA— Leadership Pioneer Valley (LPV) announced that Rosemary Manu has joined the LPV team as the LEAP Program Coordinator. Rosemary will hold various responsibilities in this position including assisting in the planning, coordination, and execution of Leadership Pioneer Valley’s nine-month leadership development program, in addition to helping recruit future LEAP program participants.

Rosemary returned to Springfield last spring after obtaining a master’s degree from George Washington University in International Development Studies with a concentration in Energy. Prior to this, she earned her Bachelor’s degree in International Relations from the University of Connecticut. Most recently, Rosemary worked as a consultant for USAID Food for Peace which provided her with monitoring and evaluation skills. She was responsible for evaluating and assessing the effectiveness of combining emergency assistance and resilience-building. She also comes to Leadership Pioneer Valley with an extensive background in the UN Women in Bangkok, Thailand, in the Disaster Risk Reduction Department. This experience expanded her research and writing skills and led her to become passionate about helping to develop communities and individuals. She hopes to bring all of her many skills she has acquired into her new role as a Program Coordinator for Leadership Pioneer Valley.

LPV Seeks Program Coordinator

Leadership Pioneer Valley works to identify, develop and connect diverse leaders to strengthen the region.  The core of the organization is a well-regarded 9-month regional leadership development program for existing and emerging leaders from non-profits, businesses and government.  The LEAP Program Coordinator reports to the Executive Director and is responsible for coordinating the LEAP Program and alumni programming.  Accepting applications until December 14th.  See link for full description: Program Coordinator Job Announcement

 

LPV Announces Hiring of Amy Britt as Leaders OnBoard Program Coordinator

Leadership Pioneer Valley Announces Hiring of Amy Britt as New Leaders OnBoard Program Coordinator

 

Springfield, MA– Leadership Pioneer Valley (LPV) is announcing that Amy Britt has joined LPV as the Leaders OnBoard Program Coordinator. In this role, Britt will be responsible for managing LPV’s board development program, Leaders OnBoard. The program aims to increase and strengthen the skills and capacities of boards of directors. This program is intended to recruit and train people who are new to board service as well as seasoned board members, with the goal of inspiring and strengthening the leadership provided to our robust network of nonprofit organizations in the Pioneer Valley.

 

Amy Britt comes to Leadership Pioneer Valley with a background in communications, marketing, and event management. She worked for Tapestry, a major regional public health agency, for over 10 years, most recently as the Director of Communications where she oversaw the communications and marketing for the organization, worked with the Development Department on fundraising campaigns and events, and supported the agency’s state and federal advocacy efforts. Amy graduated from Smith College with a BA in Biology, and was selected as an American Fellow in a U.S. State Department program focused on Women’s Health Leadership in Brazil in 2012. She is a 2014 Leadership Pioneer Valley graduate.

 

 

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Maternal Leadership

From May 1, 2018 African American Point of View

Maternal Leadership

“I am endlessly fascinated that playing football is considered a training ground for leadership, but raising children isn’t. Hey, it made me a better leader: you have to take a lot of people’s needs into account; you have to look down the road. Trying to negotiate getting a couple of kids to watch the same TV show requires serious diplomacy.”–  Dee Dee Myers

This month we will be celebrating the mothers in our lives.  Our parents are often the first people we learn leadership from—both good and bad.  Sometimes we don’t recognize the important leadership skills of mothers that are practiced in the workplace and community.

Patience

By nature, I am not a patient person.  I am often on to the next thing before finishing the last thing or even a sentence.  This can create unreasonable expectations of staff.  It can also mean missing others’ ideas and mistakes.  Being a parent has taught me patience.  It sometimes amazes me how long it can take my daughter to put on her socks or get to the point in a story.  If I try to rush her, she usually has to start all over.  By being patient, I am able to slow down and enjoy the moment.  Parenting is about allowing ourselves to be in the moment so that we don’t miss it.  My daughter probably won’t be singing exuberantly about the dog next year or next month.  The same is true in leadership.  Leaders who have the discipline of patience are able to see what’s in front of them and incorporate the ideas of others.

Blame

In our house, whenever something bad happens or someone gets hurt it is always the others’ fault.  It is so instinctual to blame others and not own our own outcomes.  Brené Brown is a social scientist who has found that “blame is simply the discharging of discomfort and pain.”  She believes that accountability is a vulnerable process that takes courage and time.  We are vulnerable when we admit fault or empathize with someone that we may have hurt.  Shifting away from blame takes time, listening and empathy.  I am working on taking blame out of my vocabulary at home and owning my mistakes to model that behavior for my girls.  I want to show them that mistakes aren’t always someone’s fault.  Similarly, as a leader I hope to be strong enough to be vulnerable enough to admit my mistakes or be empathetic enough to notice when I have wrongly blamed or hurt someone.  Admitting fault is never easy, especially when moms are trying to be Superwoman at home and work.

When you picture a leader, do you picture a mom? Why or why not?  We have been socialized to picture coaches, political leaders, and businessmen.  My mom taught me leadership lessons like showing up and getting involved if you care about something.  That is a value that I carry with me today.  My kids are making me a better leader every day by teaching me to be patient and own my mistakes.  This Mother’s Day let’s hear it for the maternal leaders in our lives.

LPV Now Accepting Applications: Early Bird Specials

MEDIA RELEASE                                       

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                              

 Contact: lwondolowski@leadershippv.org

413/737-3876 or c: 413/695-2038

Leadership Pioneer Valley Now Accepting Applications for Class of 2019

Early-bird discounts available

SPRINGFIELD, MA— Leadership Pioneer Valley (LPV) is now accepting applications for enrollment in the Class of 2019 for their regional leadership development program which begins in September.  LPV’s nine-month regional leadership development program engages the Pioneer Valley’s most promising emerging leaders through learning and exploration. Participants are trained in leadership skills by experts in a classroom setting. They also attend in-depth field experiences across the region where they meet with local leaders and explore the region’s economy and culture. Applied leadership experience is developed through work on projects for local nonprofits and government agencies. To date, nearly 250 individuals representing more than 90 companies, organizations, and municipalities have participated.

LPV is seeking applicants from non-profits, businesses and government that are eager to increase their leadership skills and take action to better the region. Applicants are considered in a competitive application process that prioritizes diversity by employment sector, geography, race, gender and sexual orientation. Emerging leaders, mid-career professionals with leadership potential, and those looking to better the Pioneer Valley should consider applying.   Those who apply by June 15th will be eligible for $100 off of their personal tuition and companies with 3 or more applicants by June 15th will receive 50% off one participant.

In its seven years running, the program has filled a critical need for a leadership program that builds a network of emerging leaders to address the challenges and opportunities of the region.  Fifty-three percent of alumni have a new leadership role at work, 64% have joined a new board of directors, and 99% made new meaningful connections.

The deadline for LPV Class of 2019 applications is July 2nd. Applications and further information can be found at www.leadershippv.org.

Formed in 2010, Leadership Pioneer Valley works to identify, develop, and connect diverse leaders to strengthen the region.

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